A New Hope for Alzheimer’s Patients?

On 7th June 2021, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a new treatment for Alzheimer’s patients in the US. This is the first treatment to be approved in almost two decades, and the first to target the cause of Alzheimer’s disease rather than just the related symptoms. However, gaps in clinical trial data have left developers, Biogen, requiring further trials. What is new about this treatment and what do the data show so far?

Contrails, Chemtrails, and Geoengineering

Who hasn't spotted a plane and those wispy white trails and thought, "I wonder where they're headed? Wherever it is, I wish I were jetting off too". However, those wispy white clouds are a huge cost to the environment and now subject to conspiracy theorists. Here we will debunk the theories, explain why contrails are such a problem, and how geoengineering could be here to help.

A Science Media Centre Internship

It is more important than ever to communicate science effectively. We must ensure accurate and evidence-based information about research is distributed through the media, particularly on controversial and headline news where most misinformation can occur. Here, I will give you a background to the Science Media Centre (SMC) and my internship opportunity with them.

The Deep Freeze

Is freezing your body the stuff of nightmares, science fiction, or a future technology to aid long space travel? I'm not sure many people would have turned down an opportunity to take a cryogenic sleep through the last year, I certainly wish it had been an option. Let's explore the science of cryogenics, where it is already used and whether could it be a future space technology.

Blog Birthday: Top 10 Articles

A Short Scientist is THREE! To celebrate three years of articles, we will look back on the top ten posts from the last three years. I adore writing and creating these snippets of science, they are a creative release for me and let my brain breathe. I hope the next year brings more doodling and science to communicate. Thank you to everyone who has taken the time to read, comment on, like or share my work, it really does mean the world, especially in a pandemic. This little blog has achieved more than I ever expected, and brings me so much joy.

Kicking a Habit

Even after the year that was 2020, I've spotted countless articles and media outlets "helping" people set New Year's resolutions and kick bad habits. Whilst I'm not one to usually set a resolution, this year I want to do more of what I love which includes these articles. So now the thesis is in and I had a Christmas break (WAHOOO), what can science tell us about habits, whether breaking or forming them?

The Robot Doctor Will See You…Eventually

At the start of lockdown in the UK back in March (2020, if anyone needs reminding...), doctors surgeries closed their doors to walk in appointments and everything went as online as possible. Whilst many would have been sceptical of a virtual consultation, I also think many have been surprised. GP surgeries have had fewer missed appointments and shorter waiting times to see a doctor. Going virtual meant many concerns could be addressed without the patient needing to come to the surgery. But what if the doctors themselves were computerised? What if we had robot doctors?

Bigger Questions: Is Time Real?

To many, time is a way of telling us when to do things or expect things to be done: when to meet, when to eat, when to sleep, but what is the scientific definition of time? One source defines it as the "indefinite and continuous duration...in which events succeed one another", meaning the past is the past and the future will always come after, a linear perception. However, what if time isn't linear and our perception is wrong? Strap in.